Sask voters go to the polls April 4

March 29, 2016 8:02 am
Kevin Weedmark


Saskatchewan’s provincial election is coming up next Monday, and candidates in the Moosomin constituency are putting on a final push for votes. We spoke with the candidates last week about the campaign. PC candidate Lloyd Hauser couldn’t be contacted.

Steven Bonk, SK Party
What is the main message you have tried to communicate during this campaign?
That the Sask Party is moving in the right direction, that we’ve had incredible growth in the last eight years and we’ve seen improvements in health care, in education, in infrastructure, and we hope that this constituency will give the Saskatchewan Party a strong mandate to keep going in the direction they’re going. There’s more to do, but we’re just starting.

Do you feel that you have managed to get your message through?
I think so. The voters have been very receptive, and very supportive of what the Sask Party has done, and what their vision is.

What have you heard from the people you’ve met with in the riding?
A lot of people are quite concerned with the economy, that we need to keep the economy growing so we can afford things like investments in health care and education and infrastructure. We need revenues to pay for all these things like education and health care.

What have you learned through this election?
That there are a lot of good people in this constituency. A lot of interesting people, and knowledgable people that I didn’t know existed before I started this process, and a lot of different values, different ideas, but it seems people want the same thing. They’re very concerned with their family, their job, and the environment they live in. People are the same all over but it’s just interesting to see the diversity we have here—I wasn’t expecting it.

Are you optimistic as you look forward to Election Day?
I am. I’m very optimistic. I think things are going well and there has been very strong support for the Sask Party here in the past and also now. Hopefully we can keep this momentum going for the next week.

Ashlee Hicks, NDP
What is the main message you have tried to communicate during this campaign?
I just hope that people recognize that I want to provide the best services for the people in the riding and all of Saskatchewan. We are strong advocates for fairness and equality.

Do you feel that you have managed to get your message through?
I feel that I have got my message through, based on the people I’ve talked to so far and the doors I’ve knocked on.

What have you heard from the people you’ve met with in the riding?
There’s a lot of concern about continuing care and underfunding of hospitals and our public schools.

What have you learned through this election?
That there is a lot of time that has to go into it. There are so many hours spent reading and getting up to speed on what’s current. It’s a really big job. There are a lot of components to it.

Are you optimistic as you look forward to Election Day?
I sure am. I’m really hoping that we have a good turnout and that people have paid attention to what has been going on.

Kate Ecklund, Green
What is the main message you have tried to communicate during this campaign?
If we don’t start thinking about the future it’s going to be too late. I’ve just been trying to educate people on the environmental issues in Saskatchewan, and put them in a realistic perspective in regards to the economy.

Do you feel that you have managed to get your message through?
I think so, for the amount that society wants to hear right now. I think people are understanding the science better. I’ve had a good response. Whether that will translate into votes is another question, because there’s fear that if we don’t go with the Sask Party our economy is going to go to crap.

What have you heard from the people you’ve met with in the riding?
People are tired of fighting with their neighbors, they’re exhausted from dealing with the water issue. It’s just getting worse between neighbors. Even at the debate we had two neighbors there, one was draining onto the other’s land.

What have you learned through this election?
I’ve learned to have a more well rounded opinion and to see that there are a lot of different people in this province in different situations and one answer doesn’t solve everyone’s problems. You need a multi-faceted, deeper approach.

Are you optimistic as you look forward to Election Day?
I am very optimistic. I’m excited to see how my work has influenced people around me, and to see that portrayed in data.

I’m sure I will be doing this again in the next election, so whatever comes from this election will be my starting point.

Janice Palmer, Liberal
What is the main message you have tried to communicate during this campaign?
The main message for me that I’m hoping people will pick up on is that we’re back, we’re a good option, and what’s been going on hasn’t been working, so it’s time to try something different, get another voice in there.

Do you feel that you have managed to get your message through?
I’m getting mixed messages, a lot of “not interesteds” and a lot of “I’ll listen to what you have to say” and of course my regular Liberal people who are “thank goodness you’re back.” So it’s a mixed bag out there.

What have you heard from the people you’ve met with in the riding?
I haven’t had a chance to talk to too many people. Door knocking didn’t happen as much as I wanted to, we simply ran out of time.

I’m not getting much of a sense of anything other than “we’ve been pretty blue out here for a long time” and I totally get that.

What have you learned through this election?
I’ve learned that you don’t have to have a big resume and you don’t have to have a lot of business experience.

The grassroots people contact and learning to trust and be trusted is the most important thing.

I think everyone has a chance to make a difference, and everyone should try in their own little way.

Are you optimistic as you look forward to Election Day?
I think you and I both know that’s a long shot. I’m optimistic to see some good numbers. I’m optimistic that there are some other constituencies that really are close, and I’m optimistic that we will get a voice in there, and I think that will give people a chance to see what we’re really about, and four years down the road, look out.

Trevor Bearance, Independent
What is the main message you have tried to communicate during this campaign?
I think we have received truly poor government. I think we have received basically a rotten deal from the Saskatchewan Party, especially in this corner, for a long time. I think a message needs to be sent to these people that we are fed up.

Do you feel that you have managed to get your message through?
Surprisingly well, I would say. As an independent you’re uphill all the way. It’s largely a matter of time in such a huge riding.

What have you heard from the people you’ve met with in the riding?
They’re profoundly fed up with politics. They have no faith in the NDP as an alternative.

What have you learned through this election?
I’ve learned a lot. I’ve figured out as I’ve gone along how I can deliver an authentic, legitimate, up-front message of who I am.

Are you optimistic as you look forward to Election Day?
It will be a revelation to me. Part of the challenge for me is that the people who resonate with what I represent typically are people who don’t vote.

I’m cautiously optimistic it will surprise some people.


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